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Abandoned places - Gulfport & Long Beach, MS (part 3)

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Nov. 25th, 2010 | 12:45 pm
location: United States, Alabama, Huntsville
mood: contentcontent
posted by: jj_maccrimmon in abandonedplaces

After many delays and a need to re-edit some of the photos, I’m now pleased to offer up the last of my abandoned site photos from the Gulfport and Long Beach, Mississippi area. Well at least from this trip. There will be more trips and photos.

Nestled away off the main roads is a true survivor. This building dates to the 1870s or 1880s. The site has survived multiple hurricanes and is in a state of arrested decay. My friend, guide and model for this trip porcelainmistre is friends with the groundskeeper and has permission to shoot there. Because I want the place to survive, I’m not showing any images from the front of the building or giving the address.


Twisted Doll – My guide bidding me (and you) welcome to the grounds



This once beautiful old home has 16 foot (4.5m) ceilings and is all cedar and oak construction. Built in the manner of many well to do larger family home from the era and region, the house is large and airy. Sometime in the 1920’s, it appears the house was turned into efficiency apartments, as several of the upper floor rooms had sinks and all had outlets for them.


Looking the front door from inside.


Upstairs


Twisted Doll (wide angle – mirror)


Kitchenette - notice that most rooms have no plaster on the walls?


Twisted Doll


Upstairs landing


Old mantle


Front window, downstairs


Parlor – now used for storage


Twisted Doll – (Tight reflection)

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Comments {10}

dcart

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from: dcart
date: Nov. 25th, 2010 06:54 pm (UTC)
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I grew up in Tallahassee, which managed really hard to try to hold onto its few antebellum and later 19th century buildings. Even being 30 miles inland, it takes work. I'm always amazed when I see stuff in the gulf coast that predates the "build with cinderblocks" era.

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JJ_MacCrimmon

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from: jj_maccrimmon
date: Nov. 25th, 2010 10:13 pm (UTC)
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When she showed me this beautiful, old estate, I was surprised it was still standing let alone rock solid inside. It's less than a mile from the beach. The floors barely made a noise (no creaking) as we walked over them. The community that it's in has it boarded and under watch, so hopefully it will stand for years to come.

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See you later, instigator

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from: oudeteron
date: Nov. 25th, 2010 07:39 pm (UTC)
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Gorgeous place, and the angle of the last photo is awesome.

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JJ_MacCrimmon

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from: jj_maccrimmon
date: Nov. 25th, 2010 10:15 pm (UTC)
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I had a great guide. The building is remarkable as is the model. Thanks for the compliment.

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loli_cat

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from: loli_cat
date: Nov. 25th, 2010 08:03 pm (UTC)
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From what I've learned by watching here, it seems to be a common practice to have uncovered wooden walls during this period in the south & southeast. I'm glad such a great place is being watched over & only hope it can be restored sometime in the future.

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JJ_MacCrimmon

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from: jj_maccrimmon
date: Nov. 25th, 2010 10:27 pm (UTC)
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The place breathes well which bodes well for the future. It appears the plaster or wallpaper was pulled (or washed) down.

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barbaricyaup

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from: barbaricyaup
date: Dec. 5th, 2010 06:30 pm (UTC)
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Uncovered wooden walls depended on economic factors. This house looks very large and fancy, so it would be strange not to have something on the walls. You can see the remnants of wallpaper in several photos. Some poorer people used to wallpaper their homes with newspaper, too. It was a sign of being wealthy enough to be literate. It's handy to get a date, too.

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Katie

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from: katiefoolery
date: Nov. 25th, 2010 11:37 pm (UTC)
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I love that parlour. It has a sort of frayed elegance - even the material draping down from the ceiling looks intentional.

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hoodwatch

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from: thehoodwatch
date: Nov. 26th, 2010 05:36 am (UTC)
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Looks like a wild west shootout would happen inside.

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JJ_MacCrimmon

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from: jj_maccrimmon
date: Nov. 26th, 2010 02:56 pm (UTC)
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It really did have that vibe to it visually. The atmosphere or feel of the place though was truly southern Gothic. I kept expecting to have Barnabus Collins step out of the dark shadows.

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