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abandonedplaces

Old Pub

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Oct. 4th, 2009 | 07:23 pm
posted by: monissaw in abandonedplaces

I have a couple of posts I made to my LJ last year from a trip to Nile (small town in northern Tasmania) that might be of interest to this community so I'll repost them here. The first one is the only two storey building in the town, the former pub.

Hotel

Now, I'm told it was built in the 1850s, by Edward Ayton, but whether he was responsible for it being built or ever owned it, I don't remember and we don't really care, I'm sure. In 1860 I have it listed as being owned by the Camerons (who still own it) with Edward as the occupier.

After that, the license passed through various hands until the last one was issued in 1926, and the hotel was closed. When the family moved out, they appear to have done so in a hurry. My grandmother told us that they threw stuff, such as bed heads, out of the window to get rid of them. She was born "in the room up there". She did point it out, but being a kid, I didn't take a lot of notice. Her father was the last innkeeper, and her grandparents before that.

I've seen a mention that it had an adjoining skittle alley. I have no idea where that was. It was known, if not officially, as the 'Cameron Arms" and I'm told the sign had a hand or arm on it.

Hotel, side



I might start by going around to the right, which is the reverse of the order I took the photos in. I wasn't about to try going inside, especially not by myself, but I did get some photos inside.

Side

The front part is two storeys high, but just one room deep. Then there's back part that is one storey with the skillion roof.

H: Left side

Not that long ago, the windows were all boarded up, but this has been removed and most of the glass is missing or broken. The photo on Dept of Environment's heritage database shows the boarded up window, and gives a view of the front that I couldn't get. The room on the bottom right with the open windows is where I'm going to start.


The front room has two external doors into it, the one on the side and the one at the front, and two internal doors.

Front room

I assume the one on the left opens into the entrance hall.

Fireplace

The side door has the chimney beside it. There was a shop or something in this room in more recent times.

Side room

Going down the right side, this is the next room along.

Side room, door

It's too dark to see the internal hall? but if I fiddle with the contrast, I get...

Through hall


Back room

From the side room, a door on the right leads through to a wash room/laundry.

Back corner

The back corner -- that's the wash room, behind the partly covered window.

From back

A view of the back.


Back porch

Moving in a bit closer. There's no shortage of comfrey here.

Back door

The back door.

Back room

The other back corner. It has a timber dado (and it's full of leaves.)

Through back room

Same room from the other side (looking through to the back porch).

Back corner

And from the outside. It's a jungle and I'm a little nervous about walking through it. Quick photos and move on.

Side

Obviously we're on the other side of the building now, the left if you're looking at it from the front.

Side room

That room with the partly covered window is rather dark.

Fireplace

Graffiti above the fireplace.


Ceiling

The ceiling, once.

Through to front room

From here though, you can see through to the front room

Ceiling

and some of the stencils on the ceiling.

Side

Moving through the comgrey to the front

H: front windows

The windows here are unbroken so I can't take photos through them.

Dirty windows

See!



H: door

Central front door, through which we shall leave!

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Comments {6}

Katie

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from: katiefoolery
date: Oct. 4th, 2009 10:37 am (UTC)
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Great photos! I love seeing local places (well, as local as you can get across Bass Strait...). This place has a very genteel feel to its abandonment. And I love the graffiti telling people not to use up the charcoal... written in charcoal.

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Monissa Whiteley

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from: monissaw
date: Oct. 4th, 2009 11:51 am (UTC)
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Thanks :)

I loved the comment too, but I hadn't actually read it (it's hard to see "in the flesh") until I was preparing this post.

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loli_cat

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from: loli_cat
date: Oct. 4th, 2009 11:38 am (UTC)
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I love that old white back door with the glass over it. A feel of sad, faded elegance. Also the stenciling on the ceiling is pretty. Was that common during that time?

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Monissa Whiteley

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from: monissaw
date: Oct. 4th, 2009 11:50 am (UTC)
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I've never seen it before, but I guess it's the sort of thing that gets lost during "restorations". I was always told this place had "murals in the front room", which I think is referring to the stenciling.

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franklanguage

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from: franklanguage
date: Oct. 4th, 2009 10:41 pm (UTC)
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Decorative stenciling was pretty common in the 19th century; there's a house near me (that isn't abandoned) that has trompe l'oeil work and decorative stenciling in some of the rooms. And yes, in their renovation work they've painted over some—but not all—of it.

Edited at 2009-10-04 10:42 pm (UTC)

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realbruts

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from: realbruts
date: Oct. 5th, 2009 08:23 pm (UTC)
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Truly cool find - neat old place...

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