November 23rd, 2010

Forsaken

I'm extremely pleased to announce the official launch of my book "Forsaken".
Published by the wonderfully like-minded people at Weird NJ magazine.

These 164 (glossy) pages represent many months of planning, researching, documenting, sweat, and more than a little blood at times.
(And the reason I have been more-or-less absent from this community for so long)
Currently it is available online via www.WeirdNJ.com but will also be available on store shelves in the beginning of December.
You can pick up a copy at any Borders Bookstore in (and close-by) New Jersey, along with most other shops that stock Weird NJ magazine.

Locations covered within the pages include: Asylums, Resorts, Camps, Homes, Railways, Schools, and a few random other un-classifiable places.
My area of coverage for this book was: New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland.

I can honestly say that this project helped me out tremendously in expanding my skills in photography, as well as writing.
My hope is that others outside the realm of "Urban Explorer" can appreciate these places as we do.

Anyway, here's a link to the book on the Weird NJ site:



Thank you,
~Rusty
  • Current Mood
    accomplished accomplished

Greene County Illinois Almshouse


In the fields of Greene County Illinois, a little out side of Carrollton, lies a huge house. This was the Greene County Almshouse, built in 1870, it was a home for the poor, mentally ill, and disabled. The residents would farm the land, take care of each other, and the children that lived there would attend Carrollton schools. Eventually smaller cottages were built around the house to care for TB patients. Eventually the need for this almshouse dropped off and it was abandoned in the 1950s.

It is listed as "threatened" on an Illinois landmark website. The farmer that owns the land wants to tear it down to plant more crops. Sadly, it seems with vandalism and natural decay, it would take a lot of money to save this building, and if anyone knows anything about funds in Illinois, they are pretty much non-existent.

This is a website that has some interesting information on the place, including records of the people who lived and died there.

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ilgreene/Almshouse/AlmshouseIndexPage.htm

I hope you enjoy...



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