June 26th, 2014

Wheal Busy Mine

Originally posted by calico_pye at Wheal Busy Mine
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Wheal Busy, sometimes called Great Wheal Busy and in its early years known as Chacewater Mine, was ametalliferous mine half way between Redruth and Truro in the Gwennap mining area of Cornwall, England. During the 18th century the mine produced enormous amounts of copper ore and was very wealthy, but from the later 19th century onwards was not profitable. Today the site of the mine is part of the Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape World Heritage Site.

The site was used for copper, tin and lastly arsenic. This area remains largely barren because of the tin deposits and of arsenious poison in the soil.
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For more Wheal Busy photos -----------------> https://www.flickr.com/photos/schnowbaby/sets/72157644914387080/

Todpool Mine ---------------------------------------> https://www.flickr.com/photos/schnowbaby/sets/72157645315576831/
 
cat man do

Love Canal

Originally posted by pigshitpoet at Love Canal
The canal loves to think that rivers exist solely to supply it with water

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Love’s Canal (a poem)

Green waters of her birth canal

Pour redemption into me, that I do the will of God,
Wallow in this forgotten habitat,
Banal, corrosive as the bowels of hell


Grown over with nature as before I did glow.

With bright sick radio-active nuclear waste,
Niagara powered machines. Cyanamid. The GM plant.
The water was full of dioxin; In other words, “death”.

Love Canal was next door.
Ill breezes carry it downstream

Party to the couple kissing on an old car seat,

And a bird gathering materials for some nest

Eloquent and new, abandoned to its desirous need
She roams, with a girth

That has slid off its rail

O woman of the world, entrap me in a web

Choices made by your wail
To feed the gaping maw of our offspring,


Who prey unconsciously upon the meek 

Their pride swells with our mortality
Her night hells swell and shriek !


In this neglected village…
~psp

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