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abandonedplaces

Mill Doctor

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Jul. 22nd, 2014 | 07:22 pm
posted by: 40ozslurpee in abandonedplaces

Standing at the end of the corridor
I visited a defunct flour mill recently, and look what unexpected horrors were hiding in its basement!

I'm not sure if the medical oddities were part of the mill originally, or if somebody moved them here for some reason. The rest of the mill, save this one creepy corridor, was full of cobwebs and mill machinery.




Dental Equipment
I'm not 100% sure what this is. It looks like it has a voltage knob, and the connectors(?) on the front are labelled "Spaced Plate, Cable Drum, Pad Sur. Act. (or on the right side) Pad Sur. Ind." Sooo, maybe electroshock therapy?? Or maybe it's a Dental instrument?

Town Dr Medical Ephemera
At the end of the display case, see? The blue thing is for X-Rays, so maybe it was another X-Ray Machine.

Antique Small Town Doctor's Tools
For delivering babies? And stuff?

Inside the glass case
I guess the case was dusty?? Or all of these bottles are haunted!!

Glass case
Facing out of the corridor again, my back against the mill machinery.

Standing at the end of the corridor
The thing on the floor looked like it came out of a department store, but I can't tell what it used to say. Maybe somebody put it there to cover a trap door. There were a lot of those, actually. See if you can spot one somewhere in these photos!

Antique Small Town Dentistry
Dental Equipment. Prescription boxes dated 1968 / 1969. I'm not sure if it's the same era as the dental equipment. Probably a little more recent? I think the Dental equipment is from the 1920's or 30's. Here's a webpage about the company: http://www.ritterdental.com/Story/TheGoldenYears/TheGoldenYears.htm

Ritter Dental Tri-Dent, 1920's

Bed and Floroscope
The thing on the right is a Floroscope(sp?) which was used before X-Rays.

Floroscope, Early X Ray
This is what you see on your way into and out of the creepy corridor. I had to lighten this picture almost 100% more in order for it to be clearly visible and not really dark and mysterious. I know. I'm brave.

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Comments {24}

Lady Celia

(no subject)

from: ladycelia
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 01:01 pm (UTC)
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Looks like someone's collection rather than a once-functional medical space.

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Mother Inferior

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from: spiderbabyx
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 01:01 pm (UTC)
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That is an amazing collection and probably quite valuable. What a find!

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tripleransom

(no subject)

from: tripleransom
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 01:23 pm (UTC)
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I'm sure that was unexpected (and creepy). Looks like the place is in good shape. Whereabouts is it? What does the rest of the mill look like?
Most of you guys are too young to remember, but Fluouroscopes used to be used to fit shoes(!) You stepped on the plate and they could see how well your foot fit into the shoe. Yeah, pretty poor excuse for radiation exposure.
The dental equipment could very well be from the 60's. That stuff tended to look pretty much the same for many years until more recently. The pictures on the wall are almost certainly from the 60's.
What's that on top of the case? A bowling trophy?

Wonder when/why all the stuff was moved there??

Very interesting! I'd love to see pics of the outside.

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40ozslurpee

(no subject)

from: 40ozslurpee
date: Jul. 24th, 2014 10:08 pm (UTC)
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I might post the rest of the mill pictures here eventually.

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Barking at the wind

(no subject)

from: evil_little_dog
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 04:00 pm (UTC)
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It looks like an X-Files episode waiting to happen.

Is that a lead-lined vest in the last photo? I wonder if there's anything that could be giving off radiation in the building.

It kind of looks like someone was going to open the place up as a local medicine museum or something, the way everything's displayed.

What great stuff, and am I shocked none of it's been stolen/broken yet.

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tripleransom

(no subject)

from: tripleransom
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 05:10 pm (UTC)
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The lead-lined vest and gloves were for use by the operator of the fluoroscope machine. It's pretty low-dose, when they work correctly, but still the operator would get a lot of cumulative exposure.

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Barking at the wind

(no subject)

from: evil_little_dog
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 06:46 pm (UTC)
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Thank you!

It's all very fascinating.

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Mystee D. Yiffer

(no subject)

from: mystee
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 04:19 pm (UTC)
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I'm pretty certain that first picture is a Diathermy machine. A means of applying heat to someone usually to help relax muscles. I'm a physical therapist and have used it in the past although it is not a typical treatment for patients anymore. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diathermy

All in all some great finds there.

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Brandoch Daha

(no subject)

from: ticktockman
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 08:56 pm (UTC)
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Looks like the same diathermy machine my father and grandfather used in their office. (They were physicians.)

I had a treatment from it once, I think for a sore hip. The effect was like using a heating pad, only deeper and without being uncomfortable on the skin.

I read through the manual on it, too. I was interested to see that there was a vaginal attachment available, but I don't think my Dad's office had that.

It was retired by the mid-80s.

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Cindy

(no subject)

from: cindyanne1
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 10:34 pm (UTC)
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My mother talks about the heat treatment she needed after my brother was born. He was a breech birth that she had delivered vaginally, and tore quite badly. She remembers getting a heat treatment "down there" that helped immensely. I wonder if that was what it was? This would have been in 1967.

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40ozslurpee

(no subject)

from: 40ozslurpee
date: Jul. 24th, 2014 10:10 pm (UTC)
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The mill was closed in 1995.

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iddewes

(no subject)

from: iddewes
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 04:24 pm (UTC)
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Very strange. It kind of looks like they had a weird museum down there.

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19_crows

(no subject)

from: 19_crows
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 05:40 pm (UTC)
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It doesn't look very abandoned, looks like a museum. I would have grabbed a bunch of stuff and come back for more!

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Brandoch Daha

(no subject)

from: ticktockman
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 09:00 pm (UTC)
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There used to be an ethic among urban explorers to leave everything in place and as you found it. Whatever happened to that?

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Ami Yuy

(no subject)

from: amiyuy
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 10:22 pm (UTC)
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+1

Look but don't touch.

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Megan

(no subject)

from: arwen_17
date: Jul. 24th, 2014 12:05 am (UTC)
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+another.

My thought to that comment was "except that's called theft."

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19_crows

(no subject)

from: 19_crows
date: Jul. 24th, 2014 03:48 pm (UTC)
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In reality I wouldn't have taken anything, especially because this doesn't look very abandoned. I don't do much exploring, just enjoy looking at pictures.

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40ozslurpee

(no subject)

from: 40ozslurpee
date: Jul. 24th, 2014 10:11 pm (UTC)
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That's precisely why I didn't take anything. It belongs to somebody.

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Brandoch Daha

(no subject)

from: ticktockman
date: Jul. 23rd, 2014 09:13 pm (UTC)
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In the picture with the best view of the diathermy, you can see a suction pump. It sitting to the right, on top of the lower glass case. It's got a large electric motor within a shroud. There's a great big jar to collect all the gunk you suctioned out, and various hoses are visible.

If you had your stomach pumped, it would be done with a device like that. It was probably useful in messy surgery, or childbirth.

My Uncle Irving (some sort of distant cousin, I think) was a dentist and was using a console like that into the 80s or later. He was my dentist. You can see a spit-sink. The dentist would raise the back of the chair and tell the patient to spit in it to get rid of saliva, blood, and whatever gunk came from cleaning the teeth. This was before dentists began routinely using suction to clear away the mess.

Power for the instruments came from an electric motor connected to a series of belts and pulleys on a jointed assembly. At the working end the final belt would spin a shaft, and the dentist would attach a tool such as a drill or polisher to the shaft. The jointed arms let the dentist work from different directions and angles to get to any of the teeth.

I think before electric motors became available there was a foot treadle to power the whole deal.

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wyvernchick

(no subject)

from: wyvernchick
date: Jul. 24th, 2014 01:49 am (UTC)
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Thank you for sharing this - it's an incredible find and it must have been absolutely fascinating to see first hand.

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40ozslurpee

(no subject)

from: 40ozslurpee
date: Jul. 24th, 2014 10:13 pm (UTC)
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It was interesting, but also creepy. I went by myself.

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(Deleted comment)

40ozslurpee

(no subject)

from: 40ozslurpee
date: Jul. 24th, 2014 10:17 pm (UTC)
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It hasn't been a mill since 1995, but was recently put on the Historic Registry right as it was about to be torn down. Mostly they left everything as-is from the day it closed down, which is why I didn't understand why there was all this medical stuff in the basement mixed in with the machinery. I may post my other mill photos later, but these were my favorites because they were so strange and out of context.

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bugeyedmonster

(no subject)

from: bugeyedmonster
date: Jul. 25th, 2014 05:16 am (UTC)
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Clearly a mob doctor operated in secret here! Bandaging bullet wounds of mobsters after a gun battle with the cops.

Joking. It's probably someone's carefully gathered collection left behind by uninterested heirs. Or they found the medical equipment too spooky to take away.

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lancasteradio

(no subject)

from: lancasteradio
date: Jul. 25th, 2014 08:53 pm (UTC)
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I love these photos. Vintage medical things are my absolute favorite!! Thanks for sharing!

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